Colloquia and Seminars

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Computer Science events calendar in HTTP ICS format for of Google calendars, and for Outlook.

Academic Calendar at Technion site.

Upcoming Colloquia & Seminars

  • Pixel Club: Understanding Scene Semantics from Vehicles

    Speaker:
    Idan Geller and Kobi Bentolila (Mobileye)
    Date:
    Tuesday, 20.11.2018, 11:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    Going from driving assistance to autonomous driving, requires a deeper understanding of the surroundings of the vehicle. Driving assistance systems provide technological solutions that help with the driving process, while these systems usually provide multiple features that enhance driving safety (such as automate lighting, adaptive cruise control, collision avoidance, etc.), they are still very simplistic with respect to their level of scene understanding. Autonomous driving, raises much more complex problems: Is the detected person a police-man that signals us to stop, is there an ambulance that signals our car to move aside? Is the detected person talking over the phone, while trying to cross the road? Common tasks, such as vehicles detection, enjoy the existence of large datasets making it easier to achieve top recognition performance. Unfortunately, this is not the case for the above-mentioned recognition challenges. In our lecture, we will present Mobileyes’ new algorithmic group, which is the first to be operating in Haifa. We will talk about its vast scope of algorithmic problems and further focus on one aspect of our work, describing innovative ways to prevent overfitting when training from a moderate amount of data (i.e, structuring and using intermediate classifiers, using heat maps as intermediate layers and self-performance evaluation by a neural network).

  • CSpecial Talk: How to Turn a Degree to a Career

    CSpecial Talk: How to Turn a Degree to a Career

    Speaker:
    Yonathan Yaniv (YOTPO)
    Date:
    Tuesday, 20.11.2018, 18:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    We are happy to invite your to the first of series of meetings on career and job seeking which will be held at CS.

    How to turn a degree to a career?
    Dr. YonathanYaniv, a CS graduate and algorithms and learning system researcher at YOTPO, will give a talk on:
    - Picking and selecting the right courses and project throughout studies.
    - Choosing the right track
    - Sorts of Student jobs

    The event will be held on Tuesday, November 20th, 18:30, Taub 337, CS Taub Building and is designated for CS undergraduate students.

    Please pre-register.

    See you all there!

  • Theory Seminar:itle: Colouring Directed Hamilton Cycles Online

    Speaker:
    Joseph Briggs (Mathematics, Technion)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 21.11.2018, 12:30
    Place:
    Taub 201

    Consider a directed analogue of the random graph process on $n$ vertices, whereby the $n^2-n$ directed edges are ordered uniformly at random and revealed one at a time, giving a nested sequence of directed graphs $D_0,D_1,\dots,D_m, \dots$. In this setting, one may ask about events that hold with probability $1-o(1)$ (whp) as $n$ tends to infinity. In particular, for a fixed $q=O(1)$, we wish to study the hitting time for the emergence of $q$ edge-disjoint directed Hamilton cycles. This is the smallest $X$ for which $D_X$ contains $q$ Hamilton cycles with pairwise empty intersection. This certainly is always at least T, the first time that $D_T$ has both minimum in-degree and out-degree at least $q$, but in fact Alan Frieze has shown that $X=T$ whp. Consider an online coloring process in which each newly appearing edge of $D_i$ is painted irrevocably with one of $q$ colors. In this talk, we present a randomized coloring algorithm that gives an online version of Frieze's result, that is, yielding a Hamilton cycle in $D_T$ in all $q$ colors. This work is joint with Michael Anastos. more details» copy to my calendar»

  • CSpecial Talk: Constructing a Trapped ion Quantum Computer

    CSpecial Talk: Constructing a Trapped ion Quantum Computer

    Speaker:
    Winfried Hensinger (Sussex Centre for Quantum Technologies)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 21.11.2018, 15:00
    Place:
    Taub 601

    Quantum computers may be able to solve certain problems that are so complicated that even the fastest supercomputer would take millions of years to provide an answer. Entanglement and superposition are quantum phenomena which can be tamed in order to build such a machine. Optimising financial transactions, machine learning, creating new medicines, understanding protein folding and breaking codes are just some of the problems where the existence of a quantum computer could change everything.

    The challenge to build a universal quantum computers has been described as difficult as manned space travel to Mars. By inventing a new method where voltages applied to a quantum computer microchip are used to implement entanglement operations, we have managed to remove one of the biggest barriers traditionally faced to build a large-scale quantum computer using trapped ions, namely having to precisely align billions of lasers to execute quantum gate operations.

    In order to be able to build large scale device, a quantum computer needs to be modular. One approach features modules that are connected via photonic interconnect, however, with only very small connection speeds between modules demonstrated so far. We have invented an alternative method where modules are connected via electric fields, allowing ions to be transported from one module to another giving rise to much faster connection speeds.

    Incorporating these two inventions, we recently unveiled the first industrial blueprint on how to build a large-scale quantum computer which I will discuss in this talk. I will show progress in constructing a quantum computer prototype at the University of Sussex featuring this technology and I will discuss a new method we have demonstrated recently in order to make quantum gates with trapped ions more resilient to sources of decoherence such as motional heating, stray magnetic fields and noise in electrical components.

    Bio:
    Prof Winfried Hensinger heads the Sussex Ion Quantum Technology Group and he is the director of the Sussex Centre for Quantum Technologies. Hensinger?s group works on constructing a practical trapped-ion quantum computer as well developing portable quantum sensors. Hensinger produced the first ion trap microchip in the world. In 2016, Hensinger and his group invented a new approach to quantum computing with trapped ions where voltages applied to a quantum computer microchip can replace billions of laser beams which would have been required in previous proposals on how to build a quantum computer. In 2017, Hensinger announced the first practical blueprint for building a quantum computer in a paper published in Science Advances. giving rise to the assertion that is now possible to construct a large scale quantum computer. Prof Hensinger obtained his PhD at the University of Queensland working with neutral cold atoms under supervision of Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Norman Heckenberg and Gerard Milburn. During his PhD, he spent an extended period at NIST in Gaithersburg in the group of Nobel laureate William Phillips where he managed to observe a new quantum effect for the first time where an atom moves both forward and backwards simultaneously. He then spent three years at the University of Michigan, in the group of Chris Monroe, developing ways to scale ion trap quantum computing before taking up a permanent position at the University of Sussex in 2005.

  • CGGC Seminar: Real-time Viscous Thin Films

    Speaker:
    Orestis Vantzos and Saar Raz (CS, Technion)
    Date:
    Thursday, 22.11.2018, 09:00
    Place:
    Taub 401

    We propose a novel discrete scheme for simulating viscous thin films at real-time frame rates. Our scheme is based on a new formulation of the gradient flow approach, that leads to a discretization based on local stencils that are easily computable on the GPU. Our approach has physical fidelity, as the total mass is guaranteed to be preserved, an appropriate discrete energy is controlled, and the film height is guaranteed to be non-negative at all times. In addition, and unlike all existing methods for thin films simulation, it is fast enough to allow real time interaction with the flow, for designing initial conditions and controlling the forces during the simulation.

    This work is jointly done with Prof. Miri Ben-Chen.

  • Coding Theory: Coding over Sets for DNA Storage

    Speaker:
    Andreas Lenz (Technical University of Munich)
    Date:
    Sunday, 25.11.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Taub 601

    In this talk, we will present error-correcting codes for the storage of data in synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). We investigate a storage model where a data set is represented by an unordered set of M sequences, where each sequence is a vector of length L over Z_q. Errors within that model are losses of whole sequences and point errors inside the sequences, such as insertions, deletions and substitutions. We derive lower bounds on the minimum redundancy that is needed to correct errors in such a storage system. We further propose code constructions for the storage channel and compare them to our bounds, which shows that many of our codes are close to optimal.

  • MMSE Approximation For Sparse Coding Algorithms Using Stochastic Resonance

    Speaker:
    Dror Simon, M.Sc. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Monday, 10.12.2018, 15:00
    Place:
    Taub 401
    Advisor:
    Prof. M. Elad

    Sparse coding refers to the pursuit of the sparsest representation of a signal in a typically overcomplete dictionary. From a Bayesian perspective, sparse coding provides a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimate of the unknown vector under a sparse prior. Various nonlinear algorithms are available to approximate the solution of such problems. In this work, we suggest enhancing the performance of sparse coding algorithms by a deliberate and controlled contamination of the input with random noise, a phenomenon known as stochastic resonance. This not only allows for increased performance, but also provides a computationally efficient approximation to the Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) estimator, which is ordinarily intractable to compute. We demonstrate our findings empirically and provide a theoretical analysis of our method under several different cases.

  • COLLOQUIUM LECTURE - Parallelizing Inherently Sequential Computations by Breaking Dependences Precisely

    Speaker:
    Madan Musuvathi
    Date:
    Tuesday, 18.12.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Microsoft Research
    Host:
    Roy Schwartz

    Large-scale data processing requires large-scale parallelism. Data-processing systems from traditional databases to Hadoop and Spark rely on embarrassingly-parallel relational primitives (e.g. map, reduce, filter, and join) to extract parallelism from input programs. But many important applications, such as machine learning and log processing, iterate over large data sets with true loop-carried dependences across iterations. As such, these applications are not readily parallelizable in current data-processing systems. In this talk, I will challenge the premise that parallelism requires independent computations. In particular, I will describe a general methodology for extracting parallelism from dependent computations. The basic idea is replace dependences with symbolic unknowns and execute the dependent computations symbolically in parallel. The challenge of parallelization now becomes a, hopefully mechanizable, task of performing the resulting symbolic execution efficiently. This methodology opens up the possibility of designing new languages for data-processing computations, compilers that automatically parallelize such computations, and runtimes that exploit the additional parallelism. I will describe our initial successes with this approach and the research challenges that lie ahead. Short Bio: Madas Musuvathi is a Principal Researcher in the Research in Software Engineering group at Microsoft Research. His research focus is on scalable analysis of concurrent systems. More broadly, his interests include systems, program analysis, model checking, verification, and theorem proving. He spend a lot of time at Microsoft building analysis tools to improve the productivity of software developers and testers. His current research projects include: Efficient Parallel Algorithms, End to End Sequential Consistency, Concurrency Fuzzing, Memory Models, CHESS. He obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. at Stanford University, where he worked under the guidance of Prof. David L. Dill and Prof. Dawson Engler. Before that, He got his B.Tech. in Computer Science from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Chennai (which was then called Madras).

  • COLLOQUIUM LECTURE - Toward human-centered programming language design

    Speaker:
    Joshua Sunshine
    Date:
    Tuesday, 1.1.2019, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University
    Host:
    Roy Schwartz

    Programming languages are a tool for human thought, expression, and work yet they are principally designed using mathematical and engineering techniques. In this talk, I will describe how our group has applied human-centered design techniques --- interviews, participatory design exercises, and qualitative analysis of developer forums --- in the design of three research programming systems (Plaid, Glacier, and Obsidian). I will speak frankly about the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and discuss speculative new techniques. Short Bio: ========== Joshua Sunshine is a Systems Scientist in the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University. He has broad research interests at the intersection of programming languages and software engineering. He is particularly interested in better understanding of the factors that influence the usability of reusable software components. He completed his Ph.D. in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon in December 2013. His dissertation focused on the usability of software libraries with ordering constraints (API protocols). He was advised by Jonathan Aldrich. He graduated from Brandeis University in 2004 and worked for almost four years as a software engineer before starting graduate school. ============================ Refreshments will be served from 14:15 Lecture starts at 14:30

  • COLLOQUIUM LECTURE - Consolidating and Exploring Open Textual Knowledge

    Speaker:
    Ido Dagan
    Date:
    Tuesday, 15.1.2019, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Department of Computer Science, Bar Ilan University
    Host:
    Roy Schwartz

    Abstract: T B A

    Short Bio:
    Ido Dagan holds B.Sc. (Summa Cum Laude) and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the Technion, Israel. He conducted his Ph.D. research in collaboration with the IBM Haifa Scientific Center, where he was a research fellow in 1991. During 1992-1994 he was a Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories. During 1994-1998 he has been at the Department of Computer Science of Bar Ilan University, to which he returned in 2003. During 1998-2003 he was co-founder and CTO of a text categorization startup company, FocusEngine, and VP of Technology at LingoMotors, a Cambridge Massachusetts company which acquired FocusEngine.